From category archives: Grow!

Sales

Be excited about how God created you

Be excited about how God created you

  We're all different--and that's good! God handcrafted each one of us into the person He wants us to be.  He has given us experiences unlike anyone else on planet Earth to help shape our character.  Be excited about how God lovingly created you! But there's a catch.  Often, we bump into co-workers, family members and friends that just rub us the wrong way.  We just don't seem to connect as well as other people do.  Researchers tell us that we'll understand and communicate well with about 25% of the population.  As for the remaining 75%, we just have to work harder. Purpose: The Motivation for Working Together If we believe God created us for a unique purpose, we also will believe that He created others for a unique purpose, too.  It is our job to find ways to connect and communicate with the 75%.  Learning how others like to communicate and work can be a challenge--but it is a great challenge to take on. In I Corinthians 12, the Apostle Paul outlines how the ...Read more »
My First Radio: A Great Companion

My First Radio: A Great Companion

RaleighTransistorRadio_250wI have fond memories of listening to Dallas' KLIF the Mighty 1190 through my Raleigh transistor radio. I took that little transistor companion with me on family vacations and listened to KHJ in Los Angeles and KJR in Seattle.

Although today's technology delivers convenience better selection and sound quality, it doesn't bring the companionship that great personalities do.

My friend Chuck Gratner when he led KOJO in Dallas during the 80s said it well:

At its' best, each medium has its' advantages:
At its' best, television entertains best.
At its' best, newspapers inform best.
At its' best, radio companions best.

Help your partners—even with Facebook?

Help your partners—even with Facebook?

"No one wants to buy radio anymore, so we're selling Facebook," said the radio station manager. I've known him for a long time and seen him as a strong manager of both commercial and non-commercial stations. He is now at a non-commercial station and talked about the great difficulty his Business Development Representatives are having with getting appointments today. He said his business development representatives are now opening conversations with prospects by saying, "How's Facebook working for your business?" The rep probes to hear what the prospect's desire for his Facebook marketing. Most businesspeople are discovering that Facebook marketing is not as easy as what they read in the press and they become dissatisfied. The rep keeps discovering more about the business prospect by asking more questions. The rep makes it clear that he is more interested in hearing about the prospect's business than telling them about the work he does at the radio station. When the prospect asks about the rep's work, he say ...Read more »
Raising Big Donations for the Super Bowl

Raising Big Donations for the Super Bowl

When the Super Bowl XLV Host Committee wanted to win the biggest game of 2011, the committee knew it also had to win about $25 million in donations to land the game for Dallas-Ft. Worth and get the area ready as a successful host.  Legendary football quarterback Roger Staubach, President of the host committee, turned to Bill Lively—the man who raised $338 million dollars for the new Dallas performing arts center.

Bill Lively is a hero in Dallas.  Not just for funding the Super Bowl host committee needs, but also because he is a master of the ask.  He isn’t afraid to ask for big sums to propel his vision.

The Dallas Morning News profiled the master fundraiser in an astonishingly candid article about fundraising. Take a few moments to enjoy the article (link below) and you’ll see that, even when you’re asking for $42 million dollars in a single gift, there can be tense and funny moments.

“I really don’t think my reps are working Friday afternoons.”

“I really don’t think my reps are working Friday afternoons.”

That’s what a manager recently told me.  He mentioned that the office was like a ghost town after lunch on Fridays.  He didn’t think his reps (both major donor and business development reps) were accomplishing things on Friday afternoon. He probably was right. Three issues seemed to be in play: The reps were beat up—mostly from self-inflicted wounds.  The reps amplified the “No” they heard from a few clients to discourage them. The reps didn’t feel like they had an advantage—the station had decent ratings, but the format was controversial in their area. The reps weren’t totally clear on what they should do to make management happy. Let’s talk about number three first.  We’ll get to the others in coming posts. The manager emphasized to the rep team his expectations—in both work-hours and dollars.  But there was probably one more area to consider: specific activity.  Most reps we see know that hard work pays rewards, but they don’t know how much hard work is requi ...Read more »
Internet 2.0 - The Growth Game-plan in a Tough Economy

Internet 2.0 - The Growth Game-plan in a Tough Economy

John Chambers runs the Internet. His work touches almost everything on the Internet.  He has a presence in almost every cranny of the Internet.  From the router than runs the broadband connection in your home to the network switches, gateways and such that run businesses and telecommunications networks, Chambers' company is driving today's Internet. And John Chambers has no intention of slowing down the progress of the company he leads--Cisco.  He envisions the Internet 2.0 where real-time video replaces the ubiquity of today's text-based world. The economic downturn doesn't dissuade him from his vision.  Chambers looked at the history of economic cycles, the tech industry and his company in devising a game-plan.  The Wall Street Journal, in a interview with Chambers, outlined the four pillars of his game-plan for a tough economy: Be realistic.  Gauge how many challenges are created by the economy and how many are self-inflicted Assess your situ ...Read more »
Take aim, be sharp

Take aim, be sharp

My digital camera broke a few weeks ago so I found a inexpensive replacement. This new, improved model helps the photographer focus on the subject through some crazy electronics guided by an easy-to-use user interface (a viewfinder with a focus area bracket). All it needs to capture a great shot is for me to get the point of focus between those little brackets. If the little brackets are to the right of the flower, I get a sharp picture of a gray fence post...not exactly what I want. Business development is like that, too. During a recession, we know--in our heart--that we need to sharpen our focus. Often, we sharpen our focus on fewer, bigger clients. That's not the strategy that succeeds in a downturn. Since we don't know which industries will improve first, we need to have a systematic way to discover when a prospect industry is emerging. In essence, we need to systematically call on sectors--we could spend a week prospecting on each industry. That covers the industry emergence, but certain businesse ...Read more »
Helping buyers in a recession

Helping buyers in a recession

"It's really hard to get a buyer's attention anymore." "Buyers seems to study things a lot longer than they used to." "My buyers are purchasing--but not buying from me as often." I've heard a lot of concerns like this from the sales teams I coach. Then I caught Scott Albro, CEO of Tippit--a technology sales research firm, on a webinar "Buyer Behavior in a Recession". (I like to check out the technology sales world since they seem to have a lot more sales research available and the principles really work well for commercial and non-commercial radio.) The webinar is worth the 30 minutes. Tippit research shows buyers have changed during the recession--and these changes appear to be permanent, so we better get used to the new reality of working with prospects and customers. Here are a few things they discovered and some of the implications I can see for radio sales: Scarcity of Attention It is harder than ever to get a prospect's attention. They're harder to get on the phone. They're harder to get to return ...Read more »
What happens when the spots come on - The impact of commercials on the radio audience

What happens when the spots come on - The impact of commercials on the radio audience

While on a station visit a while back, the program director proudly mentioned that the station's new jingle package was being sung just as we were heading to lunch. I asked what would be his new positioning with the new set of jingles. He actually sang it to me: "Non-commercial 89.3...WZZZ". I couldn't believe my ears! He is a VERY smart programmer. He also has an incredibly creative promotion mind. But I knew I really needed to say something. "So, what's the listener benefit?" He replied, "That we are non-commercial." "That's certainly a feature of the station, but 2 questions: Is that WHY people tune to you? Does the jingle align with the benefit that your listeners receive?" This extremely bright programmer stopped, looked at his cell phone and began dialing. "Hey, Jim. Have you sung our package yet? How about if we sang..." And the research shows he was right to change the jingle package. The personal people meter is showing listeners' behavior rather than a recollection of behavior. Arbitro ...Read more »
Pages: Previous12NextReturn Top
Subscribe to Paul's Blog

Recent Blogs